Tag: privacy

Incognito mode

What is incognito mode?

Incognito mode — also known as private mode — is a browser mode that gives a user a measure of privacy among other users of the same device or account. In the incognito mode, a browser doesn’t store your Web surfing history, cookies, download history, or login credentials.

Incognito mode

What does “doesn’t store” mean?

Well, as you know, browsers normally remember everything you do online: what you searched for, what pages you visited, what videos you watched, what you shopped for on Amazon, and so on. But in incognito mode, browsers don’t save any of that information.

 

When should you use incognito mode?

The simple answer is, you should use incognito mode when you want to keep your Internet activity secret from other people who use the same computer or device. Say, for example, you want to buy a gift for your spouse. You use your home PC to search for the best deals. You close the browser and turn off the PC when you’re done.

When your spouse uses the computer, say to check e-mail or Facebook, they are likely to see what you searched for, even without looking for it — either in browser history or in targeted ads. If you use incognito mode for your shopping, however, the browser will forget that history and not inadvertently spoil the surprise.

What else does incognito mode conveniently forget?

Login credentials and other form info. In the incognito mode, a browser won’t save login name or password. That means you can log in to Facebook on someone else’s computer, and when you close the browser or even the tab, you’ll be logged out, and the credentials will not autofill when you or someone else returns to the site. So, there’s no chance another person will go to facebook.com and inadvertently (or purposely) post from your account. Also, even if that person’s regular browser is set to save the data entered in forms (such as name, address, phone number), an incognito window won’t save that information.

Download history. If you download something while incognito, it won’t appear in the browser’s download history. However, the downloaded files will be available for everyone who uses the PC, unless you delete them. So, be careful with your My Little Pony films.

Are there other reasons to use incognito mode?

Incognito browsing is mostly about, well, going incognito. That said, here are a few more considerations.

Multiple accounts. You can log in to multiple accounts on a Web service simultaneously by using multiple incognito tabs.

No add-ons. This mode also blocks add-ons by default, which comes in handy in some situations. For example, you want to read the news but the page says “Disable your ad blocker to see this story.” Simply open the link in incognito mode.

How do you activate incognito mode?

In Google Chrome: You can use a keyboard shortcut or click. Press Ctrl + Shift + N in Windows or ⌘ + Shift + N in macOS. Or click the three-dot button in the upper right corner of the browser window and then choose New Incognito window. Click here for more info.

In Mozilla Firefox: Open the menu (three horizontal bars) in the upper right corner and click New Private Window. For more info visit this page.

In Microsoft Edge: Open the menu by clicking the three dots in the upper right corner and chose New InPrivate window. You’ll find more on that here.

In Chrome or Firefox, you can also right-click on a link and choose to open the link in a new incognito or private window.

To close this mode, simply close the tab or window. That’s it!

What Incognito mode isn’t suitable for?

It is always fine to use incognito browsing. But you need to understand what it can’t do. The first, very important thing to keep in mind is that incognito mode doesn’t make your browsing anonymous. It erases local traces, but your IP address and other information remain trackable.

Among those able to see your online activities:

  • Your service provider,
  • Your boss (if you are using a work computer),
  • Websites you visit.

If there is any spying software on your computer (a keylogger, for example) it also can see what you are doing. So, don’t do anything stupid or illegal.

Second, and just as important, incognito mode doesn’t protect you from people who want to steal the data you send to and receive from the Internet. For example, using incognito mode for online banking, shopping, and so on is no safer than using normal mode in your browser. If you do any of those things on a shared or public network,  use a VPN.

Source: Kaspersky Blog

Where You’ll Get Hacked [infographic]

Where You’ll Get Hacked [infographic]

People complain that they want privacy, and then they put all their information up on Facebook. Thus, hacking is ultra-easy. I have seen teenagers post pictures of their first credit card, then a month later their new college student I.D. These kids are so excited to have signs of growing up, but as we grow up our lives need to be more private to guard from hackers. Now I am a culprit of being very relaxed about my online privacy, meaning, I have the same password for multiple sites, I use my high school name as my clue, and the name of my high school is on Facebook somewhere. We may not worry about identity theft as much as physical property theft because it isn’t as scary and face to face as an actual robbery, but it is a digital robbery, identity theft can be life damaging. 

According to the  Global Security Report, cyber-security threats are increasing as quickly as we can implement measures against them. Hackers have lots of different ways to steal your private data and information. And the main reason why hackers go after your personal information is identity theft! Over the past year, there have been roughly 12.6 million victims of identity theft – or, to put it into perspective, one victim every three seconds.  No matter how safe you think you’re being online, chances are you’re making at least a few mistakes that compromise the integrity of your personal information.

To protect yourself, check out the “Where You’ll Get Hacked” infographic for more information on how hackers get a hold of your data, how you can detect their attempts and how to protect yourself and your financial future.

To see the enlarged version, click on the graphic.

where-you-will-get-hacked-infographic8001

Source: hotspotshielddailyinfographic