Tag: Policy

CYOD – Choose Your Own Device:

CYOD – Choose Your Own Device:

The organisation offers employees a choice of devices (which are likely to be from multiple manufacturers on multiple operating systems), with the organisation retaining ownership of the SIM/contract. The device can then be used by the employee for both business and personal use, with policies set centrally to manage usage.

CYOD is less about devices and more about people.

CYOD is a flexible policy where:

  • The business can expand the range of ‘company approved’ devices offered to the employee
  • Or alternatively the business can make a contribution to the employee’s own choice of device
  • Ultimately there is one dual purpose device for personal and business usage
  • Crucially the businesses own the SIM and contract for greater visibility, control and potentially lower costs.

CYOD - 1

Choose-Your-Own-Device (CYOD) overcomes the limitations of BYOD and builds upon its advantages

A CYOD policy allows IT managers to provide their employees with a menu of devices, all of which the organization will support. CYOD, therefore, gives employees a real choice in their preferred computing or mobile device, while still limiting the variety of devices that the IT department needs to work with.

 In this way, CYOD bridges the gap between the unregulated device choice and the IT department’s need to manage and secure the organization’s IT assets.

 CYOD standardizes security and management over a range of IT-approved devices. It can help businesses manage the deployment of multiple device options with the right configurations easily. 

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The CYOD phenomenon also provides a credible alternative to Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) concept.

 CYOD not only overcomes the limitations of BYOD, but it further builds upon the latter’s advantages. When organizations choose CYOD, they ensure that only the most up to date and secure versions of operating systems and apps are accessed by all employees. It is a win-win situation for employees – who get to choose a device of their preference – and the IT manager.

cyod survey

CYOD – Choose Your Own Device

DBYOD – Don’t Bring Your Own Device

BYOD – Bring Your Own Device

The key benefits of CYOD over BYOD:

  • Centralised estate management – centralised billing from a primary network provider enables a single source of billing and interrogation, greater visibility of tariff costs, personal usage and operating efficiency.
  • Reduced mobile call costs – users will benefit from reduced rates for International/roamed calls compared to standard call rates on a (BYOD) consumer tariff.
  •  Increased productivity – employees are able to select the device that they want to use which offers the user experience and functionality that suits them.
  • Clearer liability – as the company owns the SIM and associated tariff it can ensure that its usage policy and limits can be applied for personal usage and also capped for international or roaming charges. Retaining control of the SIM eliminates several grey areas around the disclosure of usage information.
  • Enterprise retains control – by owning the SIM, IT can exert much greater control over expenditure, contract negotiation, compliance, security requirements and costs.

 

BYOD Matrix

Also, by overcoming the unique set of challenges that BYOD comes with, CYOD is definitely the next step in procuring client PCs for any progressive organization.

 

Source: azzurricommunicationschooseyourowndeviceinsightciol,

BYOD

BYOD: Bring Your Own Device:

A phrase that has become widely adopted to refer to mobile workers bringing their own mobile devices, such as smartphones, laptops and PDAs, into the workplace for use and connectivity. Today, many consumers expect to be able to use personal smartphones and mobile devices at work, which is an IT concern. Many corporations that allow employees to use their own mobile devices at work implement a “BYOD policy” to help IT better manage these devices and ensure network security.

I think BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) is a great idea. It’s an excellent way to save money and to give employees what they want: device freedom.

The reality is that companies must find ways to decrease overhead without sacrificing product quality. They must increase profitability to attract investment money to continue to grow, to innovate and to explore. One significant way to do that is to allow employees to bring their own devices (laptops, smart phones, tablets) to work and use them.

There are both advantages and drawbacks to this kind of policy. In order for it to be feasible, employees must agree that lost or stolen devices can be remotely wiped (with software such as Computrace and Computrace Mobile).

Advantages of a BYOD policy:

  • Reduces IT hardware costs
  • Enables staff to work from anywhere
  • Increases feasibility of remote staff
  • Employees can meet their own demands for the most up-to-date device
  • Employees are more productive using devices with which they’re comfortable.

Drawbacks of a BYOD policy:

  • It’s difficult to make sure all employee devices have been registered and updated with remote-wiping software
  • Increased risk for introducing malware to the corporate network
  • Network access must be revoked when no longer applicable.

               Rather than dismiss a BYOD policy because of the drawbacks, IT can develop a policy to help mitigate the risks.

The VMware Company is in the process of launching Horizon Mobile, software that allows you to run both business and personal phones from one handset.

This means that should the phone be lost, or the employee leaves, any company data on the phone can be remotely wiped. The work phone can also be switched off leaving the personal phone still connected.

   The trend is powered not only by the growth in mobile devices, but by cloud computing, with companies able to buy ready-to-go virtual desktops.

IT managers on BYOD:

  • 52% accept some form of network access
  • 64% believe it is too risky to allow personal devices to be integrated
  • 49% believe the future of their organisation requires integration
  • 50% believe it can increase productivity
  • 82% have a policy in place regarding the use of personal devices at work.