Tag: Mobile device

Microsoft Names Satya Nadella Its New CEO

Microsoft Names Satya Nadella Its New CEO:

Microsoft Corp.  Announced that its Board of Directors has appointed Satya Nadella as Chief Executive Officer and a member of the Board of Directors effective immediately.  Before being named CEO in February 2014, Nadella held leadership roles in both enterprise and consumer businesses across the company.

Satya Nadella

Joining Microsoft in 1992, he quickly became known as a leader who could span a breadth of technologies and businesses to transform some of Microsoft’s biggest product offerings.

Most recently, Nadella was executive vice president of Microsoft’s Cloud and Enterprise group. In this role he led the transformation to the cloud infrastructure and services business, which outperformed the market and took share from the competition. Previously, Nadella led R&D for the Online Services Division and was vice president of the Microsoft Business Division. Before joining Microsoft, Nadella was a member of the technology staff at Sun Microsystems.

Satya

Originally from Hyderabad, India, Nadella lives in Bellevue, Wash. He earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Mangalore University, a master’s degree in computer science from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee and a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Chicago. He is married and has three children.

“During this time of transformation, there is no better person to lead Microsoft than Satya Nadella,” said Bill Gates, Microsoft’s Founder and Member of the Board of Directors. “Satya is a proven leader with hard-core engineering skills, business vision and the ability to bring people together. His vision for how technology will be used and experienced around the world is exactly what Microsoft needs as the company enters its next chapter of expanded product innovation and growth.”

Since joining the company in 1992, Nadella has spearheaded major strategies and technical shifts across the company’s portfolio of products and services, most notably the company’s move to the cloud and the development of one of the largest cloud infrastructures in the world supporting Bing, Xbox, Office and other services. During his tenure overseeing Microsoft’s Server and Tools Business, the division outperformed the market and took share from competitors.

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Microsoft is one of those rare companies to have truly revolutionized the world through technology, and I couldn’t be more honoured to have been chosen to lead the company,” Nadella said. “The opportunity ahead for Microsoft is vast, but to seize it, we must focus clearly, move faster and continue to transform. A big part of my job is to accelerate our ability to bring innovative products to our customers more quickly.”

“Having worked with him for more than 20 years, I know that Satya is the right leader at the right time for Microsoft,” said Steve Ballmer, who announced on Aug. 23, 2013 that he would retire once a successor was named. “I’ve had the distinct privilege of working with the most talented employees and senior leadership team in the industry, and I know their passion and hunger for greatness will only grow stronger under Satya’s leadership.”

Microsoft also announced that Bill Gates, previously Chairman of the Board of Directors, will assume a new role on the Board as Founder and Technology Advisor, and will devote more time to the company, supporting Nadella in shaping technology and product direction. John Thompson, lead independent director for the Board of Directors, will assume the role of Chairman of the Board of Directors and remain an independent director on the Board.

Nadella addressed customers and partners for the first time as CEO during a Customer and Partner Webcast event.

https://az169342.vo.msecnd.net/events/2014/1402/PublicEvent/media/Customer_Partner_Webcast_1000k.mp4

How peoples’ lives are changed through Microsoft technology with a Super Bowl ad. This one-minute ad celebrates what technology can do, and is narrated by Steve Gleason, former NFL player and post-Katrina hero of the New Orleans Saints, now living with ALS. Steve narrates the spot in the same way he communicates daily — using his Surface Pro to speak, via eye tracking technology

Source: Microsoft

CYOD – Choose Your Own Device:

CYOD – Choose Your Own Device:

The organisation offers employees a choice of devices (which are likely to be from multiple manufacturers on multiple operating systems), with the organisation retaining ownership of the SIM/contract. The device can then be used by the employee for both business and personal use, with policies set centrally to manage usage.

CYOD is less about devices and more about people.

CYOD is a flexible policy where:

  • The business can expand the range of ‘company approved’ devices offered to the employee
  • Or alternatively the business can make a contribution to the employee’s own choice of device
  • Ultimately there is one dual purpose device for personal and business usage
  • Crucially the businesses own the SIM and contract for greater visibility, control and potentially lower costs.

CYOD - 1

Choose-Your-Own-Device (CYOD) overcomes the limitations of BYOD and builds upon its advantages

A CYOD policy allows IT managers to provide their employees with a menu of devices, all of which the organization will support. CYOD, therefore, gives employees a real choice in their preferred computing or mobile device, while still limiting the variety of devices that the IT department needs to work with.

 In this way, CYOD bridges the gap between the unregulated device choice and the IT department’s need to manage and secure the organization’s IT assets.

 CYOD standardizes security and management over a range of IT-approved devices. It can help businesses manage the deployment of multiple device options with the right configurations easily. 

CYOD-2

The CYOD phenomenon also provides a credible alternative to Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) concept.

 CYOD not only overcomes the limitations of BYOD, but it further builds upon the latter’s advantages. When organizations choose CYOD, they ensure that only the most up to date and secure versions of operating systems and apps are accessed by all employees. It is a win-win situation for employees – who get to choose a device of their preference – and the IT manager.

cyod survey

CYOD – Choose Your Own Device

DBYOD – Don’t Bring Your Own Device

BYOD – Bring Your Own Device

The key benefits of CYOD over BYOD:

  • Centralised estate management – centralised billing from a primary network provider enables a single source of billing and interrogation, greater visibility of tariff costs, personal usage and operating efficiency.
  • Reduced mobile call costs – users will benefit from reduced rates for International/roamed calls compared to standard call rates on a (BYOD) consumer tariff.
  •  Increased productivity – employees are able to select the device that they want to use which offers the user experience and functionality that suits them.
  • Clearer liability – as the company owns the SIM and associated tariff it can ensure that its usage policy and limits can be applied for personal usage and also capped for international or roaming charges. Retaining control of the SIM eliminates several grey areas around the disclosure of usage information.
  • Enterprise retains control – by owning the SIM, IT can exert much greater control over expenditure, contract negotiation, compliance, security requirements and costs.

 

BYOD Matrix

Also, by overcoming the unique set of challenges that BYOD comes with, CYOD is definitely the next step in procuring client PCs for any progressive organization.

 

Source: azzurricommunicationschooseyourowndeviceinsightciol,

Mobile Security: 10 Simple Things You Can Do

Mobile Security: 10 Simple Things You Can Do:

BYOD (Bring-Your-Own-Device) concept is a popular trend in recent times. As per surveys just 23 percent of enterprise employees are using company sanctioned mobile devices, remaining 77 percent of employees using their own devices.

Mobile devices are more prone to malware attacks compared to earlier. Either you are using your personal mobile device or company sanctioned mobile device at work, you should be aware of latest security threats.

To understand the threat better, it’s important to review the stats found in recent study of IT Professionals:

  1. 51% organizations had experienced data loss, 59% organizations experienced an increase in malware infections as a result of insecure mobile devices in the workplace.
  2. Found 59% employees circumvent or disengage mobile security features, such as passwords and key locks, on corporate and personal mobile devices.

A single successful mobile attack can open the door to possible identity theft or worse, results in financial loss to either you or your organization.

Most of the mobile devices vulnerable because of the apps, users use to download from the internet.

In case of iPhone Apple strictly controls and inspects its App store which apps are approved for listing, but it’s not clear exactly what security measures they are checking for.

Android is more open with more distribution channels including third-party market places. Security researchers startled to find that Android malware (malicious apps) grew 3,325 percent in 2011 alone.

 App store have been very quick to remove malware once discovered, but that is typically after the damage is done.

 F-Secure has found that between Q1 2011 and Q1 2012, the number of Android malware families has increased from 10 to 37, and the number of malicious Android APKs has increased from 139 to 3,069.

For full F-Secure mobile threat PDF report, check the below link:

http://www.f-secure.com/weblog/archives/MobileThreatReport_Q1_2012.pdf

It’s time to start protecting our smartphones just like we all learned a decade ago to protect our laptops and PCs from online threats and to think seriously after looking at the sobering facts on rising mobile attacks.

10 Ways to Secure Your Mobile Gadget:

1.    Use Password protected access controls:

All mobile devices come with the ability to set a lock requiring a passcode or pattern for access. Some mobile users don’t employ even this basic safety feature! It may take you a couple extra seconds to unlock your smartphone before using it, but it could take a thief a very long time to figure out your PIN.

PINs aren’t the only locking mechanisms in use.

 Grid-based pattern locks work fine, but they leave smudge marks on the touchscreen that may be easier to guess than passwords.

 Some devices are rolling out facial recognition as an access mechanism, but this technology isn’t perfected yet so it’s not recommended.

 2.  Control Wireless Network & Service Connectivity:

 Turn Wi-Fi off completely and turn it on only when you need it, which will also save your battery power.

 It’s safest to set your phone to automatically connect only to your trusted networks, and to ask you before connecting to any other network it finds. The general rule is to limit your phone’s automatic connection capabilities to just the networks that you know.

 Select Bluetooth connectivity option also manual.

3.    Control Application Access & Permissions:

 Many of the apps store sensitive data that must be protected.

 Most of the apps require a network connection to operate. They may store data in the cloud, constantly track your location, or push updates to your smartphone. Get to know the permission settings of each app or service and what data or systems they access. You may be permitting services to access your phone without prior approval, or your apps may be pushing alerts and updates when you aren’t specifically requesting them. You can restrict all notifications at once by looking under your device’s settings.

 Turn off location based services entirely as well, so your phone isn’t constantly broadcasting your GPS location, no matter which apps request it.

4.  Keep Your OS & Firmware Current:

 Your device has an operating system that runs all of its apps and services, as well as firmware which runs the device hardware itself. It’s definitely important that you routinely accept the major updates from Apple, Google, or whoever the manufacturer is.

 Criminals are innovative; their attacks are at an alarming rate, with growing sophistication. Connect often and download security patches and other minor updates that are released to block the latest exploits. Most of these updates will be free of charge. No manufacturer wants a major attack to cripple its users, so they have a vested interest in helping you stay up-to-date.

 Android users currently using outdated firmware and OS versions that can’t be updated due to hardware incompatibility. Upgrade your device every couple years, if and when promotions are offered by your carrier.

5. Back Up Your Data:

 Small and compact, mobile devices are easy to lose or steal. Take time to backup your data, it is useful in case your phone lost, stolen or corrupted. Take data backup daily, weekly or monthly depends on your mobile usage.

6. Wipe Data Automatically if Lost or Stolen:

 Enroll your phone in a “find my phone” service. It will help you to locate your device when it is lost or stolen. These services typically have the ability to wipe your phone data remotely.

On some devices you can add extra protection such as a total device reset if the PIN is guessed incorrectly a certain number of attempts.

7. Never Store Personal Financial Data on Your Device:

 As a behavior that all mobile users should adopt, this one is pretty straightforward. Never store personally identifiable information such as such as Social Security Numbers, credit card numbers, or checking account numbers on your smartphone, especially in text messages.

8.  Beware of Free Apps:

 The problem is, more and more free and innocent apps are trying to make money from their offerings, so sometimes they track your personal information with limited disclosure or authorization, then sell your profile to advertising companies. The app developers in question may not even be aware of their privacy violations – leaking your location, gender, age and other personal data to embedded mobile ad networks while in the pursuit of revenue. Free apps are just wrappers for malware, unfortunately.

9.  Try Mobile Antivirus Software or Scanning Tools:

 The well-known PC antivirus vendors are now offering similar services to mobile users that scan and protect your smartphone just as they did your desktop.

 Some even offer additional mobile security services such as download protection, SMS/call-screening services, parental controls, and anti-phishing features.

10. Use MDM Software:

Mobile Device Management or MDM is being increasingly employed by IT departments to secure, manage and support all mobile devices that are authorized to access enterprise networks. These services control and protect sensitive and confidential business data by distributing mobile application.

 The goal of MDM is to optimize the functionality and security of your mobile computing experience, not to impede the way you like to work.

 If your organization doesn’t offer MDM, there are other options like SIM card locks and credential storage functions protect the phone by requiring a passcode to use network dependent services, and operate similar to screen/key access PINs. SIM locks prevent anyone from making unauthorized calls with your smartphone, or from removing your SIM and using it in another phone.

source: veracode,f-secure

BYOD

BYOD: Bring Your Own Device:

A phrase that has become widely adopted to refer to mobile workers bringing their own mobile devices, such as smartphones, laptops and PDAs, into the workplace for use and connectivity. Today, many consumers expect to be able to use personal smartphones and mobile devices at work, which is an IT concern. Many corporations that allow employees to use their own mobile devices at work implement a “BYOD policy” to help IT better manage these devices and ensure network security.

I think BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) is a great idea. It’s an excellent way to save money and to give employees what they want: device freedom.

The reality is that companies must find ways to decrease overhead without sacrificing product quality. They must increase profitability to attract investment money to continue to grow, to innovate and to explore. One significant way to do that is to allow employees to bring their own devices (laptops, smart phones, tablets) to work and use them.

There are both advantages and drawbacks to this kind of policy. In order for it to be feasible, employees must agree that lost or stolen devices can be remotely wiped (with software such as Computrace and Computrace Mobile).

Advantages of a BYOD policy:

  • Reduces IT hardware costs
  • Enables staff to work from anywhere
  • Increases feasibility of remote staff
  • Employees can meet their own demands for the most up-to-date device
  • Employees are more productive using devices with which they’re comfortable.

Drawbacks of a BYOD policy:

  • It’s difficult to make sure all employee devices have been registered and updated with remote-wiping software
  • Increased risk for introducing malware to the corporate network
  • Network access must be revoked when no longer applicable.

               Rather than dismiss a BYOD policy because of the drawbacks, IT can develop a policy to help mitigate the risks.

The VMware Company is in the process of launching Horizon Mobile, software that allows you to run both business and personal phones from one handset.

This means that should the phone be lost, or the employee leaves, any company data on the phone can be remotely wiped. The work phone can also be switched off leaving the personal phone still connected.

   The trend is powered not only by the growth in mobile devices, but by cloud computing, with companies able to buy ready-to-go virtual desktops.

IT managers on BYOD:

  • 52% accept some form of network access
  • 64% believe it is too risky to allow personal devices to be integrated
  • 49% believe the future of their organisation requires integration
  • 50% believe it can increase productivity
  • 82% have a policy in place regarding the use of personal devices at work.