Tag: Microsoft Windows

The top 10 features of Windows Server 2016

Windows Server 2016 as compared to the previous version focuses more on cloud and virtualization. The top 10 features of 2016 version are as follows:

1. Windows Nano Server

Nano Server is a pared down headless version (no local login) of Windows Server. Nano Server will have a 93% smaller VHD size, 92% fewer critical bulletins and 80% fewer required reboots. Nano Server is a Windows Server installation options and it’s completely headless – there’s no GUI and no command prompt. Nano Server is designed to run Hyper-V, Hyper-V cluster, and Scale-Out File Servers (SOFSs) and cloud service applications.

2. Windows Server Containers and Hyper-V Containers

The next biggest change in Windows Server 2016 will be support for containers. Containers enable you to isolate your applications from the underlying OS improving the deployment and reliability of those applications. Windows Server 2016 will provide two kinds of native containers: Windows Server Containers and Hyper-V Containers.  Windows Server Containers are isolated from each other, but they run directly on the Windows Server 2016 OS. Hyper-V Containers provide enhanced isolation by running the containers from a Hyper-V VM.

FB-Server-2016-2-1200x600

3. Docker Support

Docker is an open-source engine that’s used for building, running and managing containers. Docker containers were originally built for Linux but the next version of Windows Server will provide built-in support for the Docker engine as well. A new open-source Docker engine project has been built for Windows Server with Microsoft participating as an active open source community member. You can use Docker to manage Windows Server and Hyper-V Containers.

4. Rolling upgrades for Hyper-V and Storage clusters

One of the biggest new changes for Hyper-V in Windows Server 2016 is rolling upgrades for Hyper-V clusters. The new rolling upgrades feature allows you to add a new Windows Server 2016 node to a Hyper-V cluster with nodes that are running Windows Server 2012 R2. The cluster will continue to run at the Windows Server 2012 R2 functional level until all of the cluster nodes have been upgraded to Windows Server 2016. When the cluster has mixed level nodes the management must be done from Windows Server 2016 or Windows 10. New VMs on a mixed cluster will be compatible with the Windows Server 2012 R2 feature set.

5. Hot add & remove of virtual memory network adapters

Another great new feature in Windows Server 2016 Hyper-V is the ability to add and remove the virtual memory and virtual network adapters while the virtual machine is running. In previous releases, you need to use dynamic memory to change the minimum and maximum RAM settings of a VM that is running. Windows Server 2016 enables you to change the allocated RAM while the VM is active even if the VM is using static memory. Likewise, you add and remove network adapters while VM is running.

6. Nested virtualization

Added primarily for the new container support, Windows Server 2016’s nested virtualization capabilities will also be a handy addition for training and lab scenarios. With this new feature, you are no longer limited to running the Hyper-V role on a physical server. Nested virtualization enables you to run Hyper-V within a Hyper-V virtual machine.

7. PowerShell Direct

PowerShell is a great management automation tool but it can be complicated to get it to run remotely against your VMs. You need to worry about security policies, firewall configurations, and your host networking configuration. PowerShell Direct enables you to run PowerShell commands in the guest OS of a VM without needing to go through the network layers. Like VMConnect (the remote console support provided by the Hyper-V Manager) it requires zero configuration it connects directly to the guest VM and all you need are authentication credentials for the VM’s guest OS.

8. Linux Secure Boot

Another new feature in Windows Server 2016 Hyper-V is the ability to enable secure boot for VMs with Linux guest operating systems. Secure Boot is a feature of the UEFI firmware specification incorporated in Generation 2 VMs that protects the VM’s hardware kernel mode code from being attacked by rootkits and other boot-time malware. Previously, Generation 2 VMs supported Secure Boot for Windows 8/8.1 and Windows Server 2012 VMs but not VM’s running Linux.

9. New Host Guardian Service and Shielded VMs

The Host Guardian Service is a new role in Windows Server 2016 that enables shielded virtual machines and protects the data on them from unauthorized access – even from Hyper-V administrators. Shielded VMs can be created using the Azure Management Pack Portal. Standard VMs can also be converted to Shielded VMs. With Shielded VMs Hyper-V virtual disks can be encrypted with BitLocker.

10. Storage Spaces Direct

Windows Server 2016 also has a number of storage system improvements one of the most important is the new Storage Spaces Direct feature. Storage Spaces Direct is the evolution of the previous Storage Spaces technology found in Windows Server 2012 R2. Windows Server 2016 Storage Spaces Direct allows a cluster to access JBOD storage in an external enclosure like Windows Server 2012 R2 or it can also allow access to JBOD and SAS disks that are internal to the cluster nodes. Like the previous release, Store Spaces form the basis for Storage Pools and they support both SSD and HDD disks and data tiering.

Source: itprotoday

What is that popup on Windows 10 that disappears after a split second?

If you run Windows 10, you may have noticed a popup window being launched on the screen once a day, or even regularly.

It is spawned and immediately closed again. This makes it difficult to understand what spawns it, why it is launched, and whether it is something that you need to be concerned about.

One of the issues of this is that you may be thrown out of full-screen applications when that happens. Several users of Windows 10 reported that they get the window every hour or so and that it makes playing games a nightmare because of that.

The file that gets executed every hour or so is called officebackgroundtaskhandler.exe, and you can find it under

C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Office\root\Office16\officebackgroundtaskhandler.exe

If you check the log on your system, for instance, you may notice that this is the case on your Windows 10 device.

officebackgroundtaskhandler

This issue has been a hot topic since April 15th when a user reported it on Microsoft’s official Answer forum.

Is there a really, really good reason that the “OfficeBackgroundTaskHandlerRegistration” task (see it in Task Scheduler, Microsoft, Office) must run every hour?  This is what it says that it does: “This task initiates Office Background Task Handler, which updates relevant Office data.”

 I ask because it runs officebackgroundtaskhandler.exe in such a way that it flashes a window (itself) on the screen. Only instantaneously to be sure, but it’s noticeable, especially once you catch onto what’s happening. You can run the task manually if you want to see it without waiting.

 Why doesn’t the task use one of the many tricks to hide a window from displaying? 

If Microsoft Office runs on the Windows 10 machine, two tasks are scheduled to run OfficeBackgroundTaskHandler. They are:

  • OfficeBackgroundTaskHandlerLogon which runs when the user logs on to the system.
  • OfficeBackgroundTaskHandlerRegistration which runs every hour.

 Solutions:

The task window should not be launched when the task is run, and there are plenty of ways that Microsoft could have picked to hide the task window instead of spawning it every hour on the user system.

The two main options that you have been to disable the task, or to switch it from running under User to System.

1.     Disabling the Task

office task

It is unclear what the task does, and you should monitor Office closely after disabling it to make sure everything works as intended. The task is still run on login though.

  1. Tap on the Windows-key, type Task Scheduler, and hit the Enter-key.
  2. Go to Task Scheduler > Task Scheduler Library –> Microsoft > Office
  3. Locate the task OfficeBackgroundTaskHandlerRegistration.
  4. Right-click on the task, and select the disable option.

2.     Run under System account

The second option that you have is to change the user group the task runs under. Switching it to System reportedly hides the popup window from spawning.

office task2

  1. Tap on the Windows-key, type Task Scheduler, and hit the Enter-key.
  2. Go to Task Scheduler > Task Scheduler Library > Microsoft > Office
  3. Right-click on OfficeBackgroundTaskHandlerRegistration and select Properties.
  4. Select “Change User or Group”.
  5. Type system.

Click ok.

Or Wait for some time, Microsoft is going to release the patch build 16.0.8201.2025. As of now this patch released for those participating in the Office Insiders Slow program. It will be included in a future update for those not participating in Insiders.

How to install Office updates manually?

Check the link given below:

https://support.office.com/en-us/article/Install-Office-updates-2ab296f3-7f03-43a2-8e50-46de917611c5

Source: ghacks, Microsoft, MS Office

How to enable Administrator account in Windows 8.1 & Windows 10 Home Single Language

Use the following steps to active administrator account.

  1. Open the command prompt as Administrator

Normally, the command prompt can be opened as a regular user to run commands that don’t require administrative rights. However, if you need to run a command that requires administrative rights, you must open the command prompt window as administrator.

  • The first method of accessing the command prompt as administrator is to right-click on the Start button  1  in the lower-left corner of the screen and select the Command Prompt (Admin) option from the  User menu.

You can also press the Windows key + X to access this menu.

2

–  The second method involves the Start screen. If you are currently on the Desktop, click the Start button in the lower-left corner of the screen.

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On the Start screen, start type “command prompt” (without the quotes). The Search panel displays on the right side of the screen and results of the search display as you type. Right-click on Command Prompt and select Run as administrator from the popup menu.

23

So now you are opened the command prompt in administrator mode.

2. Type below given command to see the users list:

C:\WINDOWS\System32>net user

3. Unlock the administrator account.

C:\WINDOWS\System32>net user administrator /active: yes

  1. Give a password.

C:\WINDOWS\System32>net user administrator *

(* – type the password)

Source: howtogeek

 

How to: Determine Which .NET Framework Versions Are Installed

Users can install and run multiple versions of the .NET Framework on their computers. When you develop or deploy your app, you might need to know which .NET Framework versions are installed on the user’s computer.

Note that the .NET Framework consists of two main components, which are versioned separately:

  • A set of assemblies, which are collections of types and resources that provide the functionality for your apps. The .NET Framework and assemblies share the same version number.
  • The common language runtime (CLR), which manages and executes your app’s code. The CLR is identified by its own version number.

To get an accurate list of the .NET Framework versions installed on a computer, you can view the registry.

To find .NET Framework versions by viewing the registry (.NET Framework 1-4)

  1. On the Start menu, choose Run.
  2. In the Open box, enter regedit.exe.

You must have administrative credentials to run regedit.exe.

3. In the Registry Editor, open the following subkey:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\NET Framework Setup\NDP

The installed versions are listed under the NDP subkey. The version number is stored in the Version entry. For the .NET Framework 4 the Version entry is under the Client or Full subkey (under NDP), or under both subkeys.

1 Frame work

To find .NET Framework versions by viewing the registry (.NET Framework 4.5 and later)

  1. On the Start menu, choose Run.
  2. In the Open box, enter regedit.exe.

You must have administrative credentials to run regedit.exe.

3. In the Registry Editor, open the following subkey:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\NET Framework Setup\NDP\V4\Full

Note that the path to the Full subkey includes the subkey Net Framework rather than .NET Framework.

2 Framework

Check for a DWORD value named Release. The existence of the Release DWORD indicates that the .NET Framework 4.5 or newer has been installed on that computer.

IC664979

The value of the Release DWORD indicates which version of the .NET Framework is installed.

Net Frame work

Source: Microsoft

You cannot modify the Hosts file or the Lmhosts file in Windows 7 and Windows 10

When you try to change the Hosts file or the Lmhosts file in Microsoft Windows 10, or Windows 7, you may receive an error message that resembles either of the following.

Error message 1

Access to C:\Windows\System32\drivers\etc\ hosts was denied

Error message 2

Cannot create the C:\Windows\System32\drivers\etc\hosts file.
Make sure that the path and file name are correct.

This issue occurs even though you log on by using an account that has administrative credentials.

WORKAROUND

 

To work around this issue, follow these steps:

  • Click Start 1, click All Programs, click Accessories, right-click Notepad, and then click Run as administrator.

2If you are prompted for an administrator password or for a confirmation, type the    password, or click Allow or Yes.

  • Open the Hosts file or the Lmhosts file, make the necessary changes, and then click Save on the Edit  If using Windows 7, you will need to click Save on the File menu.

source: Microsoft

How to find system up-time on Windows 7, 8 & 2008 Server

If you leave your computer on for extended periods of time, it’s usually a good idea to perform a reboot now and then. Furthermore, if you’re managing multiple computers, it’s difficult to remember when each received a reboot. That’s why Windows keeps track of your total up-time and the last time your computer booted for you. Here’s how to access those pieces of information:

To find total up-time:

Step 1: Launch the task manager. You can do this in one of three ways:

Choice 1: Press Ctrl+Alt+Delete. On the screen that appears, select Start Task Manager.

Choice 2: Right click on the taskbar and select Start Task Manager.

Choice 3: Press CtrlL+Shift+Esc to launch the task manager directly.

Step 2: In this window, click on the Performance tab.

Task Manager-1

Task Manager

Step 3:  Your system’s up-time is displayed next to Up Time (highlighted in the above picture) in the format of Days: Hours: Minutes: Seconds

To find last boot date:

Go to Start  –> Run –> cmd

cmd

In the command prompt, run the following commands: systeminfo | find /i “Boot Time”

-or-

systeminfo | find “Time:”

-or-

systeminfo | find “System Boot Time”

cmd-1

Cheers,

Happy Computing 🙂

source: cnet, superuser, serverfault