Tag: Facebook

Where You’ll Get Hacked [infographic]

Where You’ll Get Hacked [infographic]

People complain that they want privacy, and then they put all their information up on Facebook. Thus, hacking is ultra-easy. I have seen teenagers post pictures of their first credit card, then a month later their new college student I.D. These kids are so excited to have signs of growing up, but as we grow up our lives need to be more private to guard from hackers. Now I am a culprit of being very relaxed about my online privacy, meaning, I have the same password for multiple sites, I use my high school name as my clue, and the name of my high school is on Facebook somewhere. We may not worry about identity theft as much as physical property theft because it isn’t as scary and face to face as an actual robbery, but it is a digital robbery, identity theft can be life damaging. 

According to the  Global Security Report, cyber-security threats are increasing as quickly as we can implement measures against them. Hackers have lots of different ways to steal your private data and information. And the main reason why hackers go after your personal information is identity theft! Over the past year, there have been roughly 12.6 million victims of identity theft – or, to put it into perspective, one victim every three seconds.  No matter how safe you think you’re being online, chances are you’re making at least a few mistakes that compromise the integrity of your personal information.

To protect yourself, check out the “Where You’ll Get Hacked” infographic for more information on how hackers get a hold of your data, how you can detect their attempts and how to protect yourself and your financial future.

To see the enlarged version, click on the graphic.

where-you-will-get-hacked-infographic8001

Source: hotspotshielddailyinfographic

Data Never Sleeps

How much Data Is Generated Every Minute?

Data never sleeps. Every minute massive amounts of it are being generated from every phone, website and application across the Internet. Just how much data is being created and where does it come from?

For that you should check out this Domo Infographic.

Click twice to View Full-Sized Image

source: Domo

Pwnium: rewards for exploits

Google’s Giving $60,000 to Whoever Can Exploit Chrome :

Google has offered prizes, totalling $1 million, to those who successfully hack the Google Chrome browser at the Pwn2Own hacker contest taking place today i.e. 7March 2012. Chrome is the only browser in the contest’s six year history to not be exploited like at all. 

Therefore Google will hand out prizes of $60,000, $40,000, and $20,000 for contestants able to remotely commandeer a fully-patched browser running on Windows 7. Finding a “Full Chrome Exploit,” obtaining user account persistence using only bugs in the browser itself will net the $60k prize. Using webkits, flash, or a driver-based exploit can only earn the lesser amounts.

Prizes will be awarded on a first-come-first-serve basis, until the entire $1 million has been claimed. While we’re proud of Chrome’s leading track record in past competitions, the fact is that not receiving exploits means that it’s harder to learn and improve,” said Chris Evans and Justin Schuh, members of the Google Chrome security team. 

To maximize our chances of receiving exploits this year, we’ve upped the ante. We will directly sponsor up to $1 million worth of rewards.”  Pwn2Own isn’t the only time researchers can be paid for digging up security flaws in Chrome. Like other companies including Mozilla and Facebook, Google offers “bug bounties” to researchers, and its flaw-buying program has given out more than $300,000 in payments over the last two years.

source:thehackernews,blog.chromium

Researchers spot scammers using fake browser plug-ins

Fake Browser Plug-in—A New Vehicle for Scammers:

Security researchers from Symantec have spotted a fake browser plugin-in currently circulating in the wild.

 How the infection takes place:

The scenario is very simple: the victim is lured into watching some video; but instead of asking the victim to share/like the video, (which we have seen in many scams) the scammers present the victim with a fake plug-in download image, which is required to see the video.

Once the end users are tricked into installing the fake YouTube themed browser extension, their User-Agent info is retrieved and accordingly, the fake plug-in is downloaded. For the time being, only Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome plug-ins are being used.

The scam is currently circulating, using the [Video] Leakead video of Selena Gomez and Justin Beiber [NEW HOT!!] theme.

facebook / youtube

This isn’t the first time that scammers are relying on fake browser plugins and extensions as a propagation vehicle for their scams. In December 2011, researchers from WebSense have detected a malicious campaign where the scammers were successfully hijacking Facebook accounts using bogus browser extensions

 Scammers are always looking for different techniques to lure users .

Facebook users are advised to be extra vigilant when interacting with content shared on the most popular social networking site.

Additional Facebook Security Tips:

  • Review your security settings and consider enabling login notifications. They’re in the drop-down box under Account on the upper, right-hand corner of your Facebook home page.
  • Don’t click on strange links, even if they’re from friends, and notify the person if you see something suspicious.
  • Don’t click on friend requests from unknown parties.
  • If you come across a scam, report it so that it can be taken down.
  • Don’t download any applications you aren’t certain about.
  • For using Facebook from places like hotels and airports, text “otp” to 32665 for a one-time password to your account.
  • Visit Facebook’s security page, and read the items “Take Action” and “Threats.”

source: symantec,zdnet